You will never forget the name of LES MISERABLES after watching these five new clips

Last week we got our first public reactions to Tom Hooper’s screen adaptation of Les Miserables and to say that they were slightly positive, would be like saying that the Broadway production of Les Miserables is only slightly successful.

Now after a couple of sweeping trailers, we get these 5 clips showing off the singing prowess of the film’s main stars. Well, except maybe for Russell Crowe. He should maybe stick to throwing phones.

“Les Misérables” is the motion-picture adaptation of the beloved global stage sensation seen by more than 60 million people in 42 countries and in 21 languages around the globe and still breaking box-office records everywhere in its 27th year. Helmed by “The King’s Speech’s” Academy Award®-winning director, Tom Hooper, the Working Title/Cameron Mackintosh production stars Hugh Jackman, Oscar® winner Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway and Eddie Redmayne.

Set against the backdrop of 19th-century France, “Les Misérables” tells an enthralling story of broken dreams and unrequited love, passion, sacrifice and redemption–a timeless testament to the survival of the human spirit. Jackman plays ex-prisoner Jean Valjean, hunted for decades by the ruthless policeman Javert (Crowe) after he breaks parole. When Valjean agrees to care for factory worker Fantine’s (Hathaway) young daughter, Cosette, their lives change forever.

In December 2012, the world’s longest-running musical brings its power to the big screen in Tom Hooper’s sweeping and spectacular interpretation of Victor Hugo’s epic tale. With international superstars and beloved songs–including “I Dreamed a Dream,” “Bring Him Home,” “One Day More” and “On My Own”–”Les Misérables,” the show of shows, is now reborn as the cinematic musical experience of a lifetime.

Hooper famously decided not do the standard ADR for the actor’s singing but rather to record them singing live on set in single unbroken takes, and you can really see the difference it makes here. With the exception of Crowe, who sounds like he could do with a bit of studio tweaking, everybody not only sounds amazing, but they can now actually “act” through their singing. Small nuances, like distressed breathing and speech tics all come through way more clearly than if it had all been recorded in post-processing, and all add up to make it feel more like you’re watching an actual stage performance instead of a really long, big budget music video.

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