Extras! Arnold’s a screamer, Bobby Moresco heads to The Harbor, Superman checks into hospital, Del Toro’s Pinocchio has its strings cut, Indy 5 still going ahead and Oh snap, son! You just got served by Siskel and Ebert! Plus much more!

Welcome to The Extras! A daily dose of all the smaller movie related news, clips and just plain cool stuff that you might have missed!

I’m pretty sure that anybody nominated for Best Supporting Actress at this year’s Oscars who is not named Anne Hathaway, are already practicing their dignified loser’s face in the mirror. Ms Hathaway seems like a complete shoe-in for her musical turn in Les Miserables, and if you wonder why that is, then this hilarious rendition of Hathaway’s signature song, “I Dreamed a Dream”  performed by actress Emma Fitzpatrick (Social Network, The Collection), should convince you.

Up and coming actor Sam Clafin (Snow White and the Hunstman) is set to soon become a household name, particularly if your household consists of only teenage girls, as he takes on the role of the dashing Finnick Odair in The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. He nearly lost out on that opportunity though, as it was actually offered to Garret Hedlund first. Luckily for Sam though, Garrett isn’t much of a speed reader.

“They did [approach me], but I was working on this film at the time. We shot the whole film in 23 days and I was really immersed in it. I couldn’t get around [to reading the Hunger Games. Everybody around me is flipping out about the books, and I didn’t really have the time to sit down lately to read any book, not just Hunger Games.”

Bobby Moresco, the Oscar winning writer of Crash (the Steven Soderbergh Crash not the James Spader humps Holly Hunter’s leg wound Crash) is set for sophomore turn behind the camera as he will write and direct crime action-thriller The Harbor. Moresco’s script for The Harbor - described by producer Lisa Wilson as “one of the most thrilling scripts I have read for a very long time”  – is adapted from the Joseph P. O’Donell novel, Deadly Codes, and deals with a New Orleans P.I. who uncovers a governmental conspiracy concerning the country’s top spy agency while investigating the death of a lady. Man, I hate it when that happens.

And now for the completely random portion of today’s entertainment: A supercut video of every Arnie scream ever. Or as I like to call it, “The mating call of the Yukon Moose, while trying to swallow a live porcupine.”

Despite his supposed retirement, and many fans’ wishes to the contrary, George Lucas is still going ahead with Indiana Jones 5. Now while I never expected it to not happen, there’s just too much money still to be made, I was really hoping that Lucas would pull a Star Wars and hand the reins over to people who haven’t spent the last few decades more worried about their beard than their work. But according to director Steven Spielberg, it’s either Lucas or nothing.

“I will not make another Indiana Jones film unless it’s based on George’s story.”

And apparently Georgie boy is working on exactly that, but “the timetable is unclear”. Now while I don’t think that Crystal Skull was a 100% complete fail, as there were still a few rather good Indy moments, that film’s worst crimes was definitely all Lucas. Let’s hope that that doesn’t happen again. Fridges beware.

If you’ve been eagerly waiting more news on Guillermo Del Toro and Jim Henson Company’s proposed dark and twisted Pinocchio stop-motion movie after checking out the really cool concept art released for it last year, well then it looks like you’re barking up the wrong wooden puppet. Gris Grimly, the artist whose story Del Toro would have adapted for the movie, took to his twitter to reveal that project is now dead.

@GrisGrimly: “Short to the point update on Pinocchio for those inquiring: It appears that this is not the right time for such a superior-adventurous flick”

@GrisGrimly: “There are people like us out there. But they look at numbers. Frankenweenie was a box office failure to them.”

Yep, that’s right. Blame Tim Burton and that creepy kid with the dead dog for not making enough money at the box office and in the process scaring off producers for another dark stop motion movie.

Like most net-savvy folks over the age of 25, I used to be a frequent Napster user back in the day (sorry, Lars and James). Ah, I can still remember the electronic chirp and screech as my 28.8kbps modem (you kids of today don’t know the hardships we endured) got me the coolest new music with just a few clicks (and a few hours waiting). Napster truly was revolutionary, which is why I’m eagerly awaiting the release of Downloaded, Alex “that guy from Bill and Ted that isn’t Keanu Reeves”  Winter’s new documentary about the file sharing software. Until the 15 March 2013 release date you’ll have to make do with this newly released trailer for it.

Look, in the sky! Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s badly thought out intro to a story about Smallville star Tom Welling joining the cast of Parkland! Welling is the latest in a very long line of actors/actresses – which includes Paul Giamatti, Billy Bob Thornton, Jacki Weaver, Zac Efron, Marcia Gay Harden, James Badge Dale, Jackie Earle Haley, Colin Hanks, David Harbour and Ron Livingston – to star in the factual drama. The film, adapted from Vincent Bugliosi’s non-fiction book  ”Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy”, deals with the chaotic events at the Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas which is where JFK was rushed to after being assassinated, and where he was declared dead.

And for our tinfoil hat wearing audience, it’s also interesting to note that JFK’s assassin (or supposed assassin, depending on your belief), Lee Harvey Oswald was also rushed to and died in Parkland after being shot by Jack Ruby two days after the assassination. Four years later, Ruby himself was to be rushed to Parkland and die in the very same emergency operating theatre as Oswald from a pulmonary embolism. DUN DUN DUUUUHHHHNNN!

We got our first look at Amy Adams as Lois Lane in this newly released black and white image for Man of Steel. This pic is significant for being the first officially released image that doesn’t just show Superman/Clark Kent (Henry Cavill), Zod (Michael Shannon) and Jor-El (Russell Crowe). It also tells us absolutely nothing about the film except that in it, Amy Adams will look exactly like Amy Adams.

In a quest (I guess) to prove that JJ Abrams’ Star Wars fanboy credentials are legit, the official Star Wars blog has gone and collected every public thing that director JJ Abrams has ever said about the franchise.

Max Borenstein, writer of Gareth Edwards’ upcoming Godzilla reboot, will soon be proving that he can write about monsters big and small, as he has been tapped by New Regency to adapt Dan Sehlberg’s novel Mona. Here’s the book’s blurb, which does sound rather intriguing:

Eric Söderquist, professor of computer science at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, has invented Mind Surf: a thought-controlled system that allows people with disabilities to browse the web.

Lebanese Samir Mustaf is a former MIT professor whose daughter Mona was killed by an Israeli cluster bomb five years earlier. He has just completed the most sophisticated computer virus the world has ever seen, for the purpose of a cyber attack against Israel’s financial system.

Eric’s wife Hanna falls into a coma – struck by an aggressive and previously unknown virus – after having tested her husband’s invention. The doctors are at a loss. Although everyone around him thinks he’s gone mad, Eric is convinced that his wife has been infected by a powerful computer virus known as Mona, and that the only way he can save her is by tracking down its creator. In a dramatic and increasingly dangerous pursuit Eric gets closer to his academic equal Samir, with both Mossad and Hezbollah following his every move. In Stockholm the mysterious virus has just claimed its first victim and Hanna’s condition is deteriorating quickly.

I’m pretty sure that I’ve met people who have been infected with a virus that lowers their intelligence after surfing certain sites online.

Despite the fact that it’s held aloft as true classics now, not everybody was a fan of the original Star Wars trilogy when it first came out. One such non-fan was critic John Simon, who thought they were movies for stupid children which made children even more stupid. Luckily, Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel was there to put him in his place.

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